THE EFFECT OF POLYMORPHISM IN GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASES ON THE DEVELOPING SECOND MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS AFTER LEUKEMIA TREATMENT IN CHILDHOOD

  • Janez Jazbec Služba za onkologijo in hematologijo Pediatrična klinika Klinični Center Vrazov trg 1 1525 Ljubljana
  • Vita Dolžan Inštitut za biokemijo Medicinska fakulteta v Ljubljani Vrazov trg 2 1000 Ljubljana
  • Maruša Debeljak Služba za onkologijo in hematologijo Pediatrična klinika Klinični Center Vrazov trg 1 1525 Ljubljana
  • Richard Aplenc Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 34th Street Philadelphia USA
  • Berta Jereb Onkološki inštitut Ljubljana Zaloška 2 1000 Ljubljana
Keywords: gluthatione S-transferase, childhood leukemia, secondary neoplasm

Abstract

Background. Survivors of childhood leukemia have an increased risk of developing second malignant neoplasms and specific treatment factors such as alkylating agents, topoisomerase inhibitors and radiation have been associated with their occurrence. Genetic polymorphism in drug-metabolizing enzymes may result in impared detoxification of chemotherapeutics and may lead to increased risk for cancer.

Methods. To test if polymorphism in glutathione S-transferases (GST) genes is associated with occurrence of secondary malignant neoplasms, we compared GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genotypes among 16 patients treated for childhood leukemia in whom second neoplasm occurred and matched the control group.

Results. GSTM1 null genotype was found in 44% of patients with second neoplasms and in 50% in control group (p = 0.768), GSTT1 null genotype in 19% of cases and in 29% of controls (p = 0.729) and GSTP1 105 Ile/ile in 50% of cases and 37% of controls (p = 0.537). Differences in distribution of GST genotypes in patients with second neoplasms after childhood leukemia, compared to a matched control group of patients were not statistically significant.

Conclusions. In our study we were not able to show relation between GST genotype and occurrence of second neoplasms after the childhood acute leukemia.

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How to Cite
1.
Jazbec J, Dolžan V, Debeljak M, Aplenc R, Jereb B. THE EFFECT OF POLYMORPHISM IN GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASES ON THE DEVELOPING SECOND MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS AFTER LEUKEMIA TREATMENT IN CHILDHOOD. ZdravVestn [Internet]. 1 [cited 26Jun.2019];73. Available from: https://vestnik.szd.si/index.php/ZdravVest/article/view/2416
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